From: odd...@cix.compulink.co.uk ("Stephen Walters")
Subject: Killer apps for Linux
Date: 1996/11/09
Message-ID: < E0Lo8F.6I0@cix.compulink.co.uk>#1/1
X-Deja-AN: 195474371
organization: Compulink Information eXchange
x-news-software: Ameol32
newsgroups: comp.os.linux.advocacy


There is no doubt in my mind that the success (and by this, I mean 
popularity) of an operating system depends on applications.

Apple][+Visicalc+(Cp/m+wordstar+dBASE][) ==>success.
IBM PC + Lotus 1-2-3 +dBASEIII+Wordperfect ====>success
Apple MAC +Pagemaker+Photo paint/Photoshop etc ======>success.
etc

These platforms became success with the help of killer applications, 
programs/applications which were, AT THE TIME, broke new ground in 
performance, functionality and value/productivity.

What I would like to know, besides Web Browsers and servers, where are 
these applications for Linux? I should be more specific, where are the 
shareware/freeware equivalents?

Here is an interesting dilemma. 

I have a friend who has a small business, which he would like to network 
and modernise. He has a handful of non-networked PC. His budget is 
limited and he knows this. 

This is what I am currently considering:-

1 NT Server + Win95 clients + ethernet + Ms exchange(Optional).

2.Netware 4.1+ Win95 clients + ethernet +Novell MHS.

3.Linux server+ Win95 clients+ethernet+Unix send mail(Optional)

4.Linux server +Linux clients+ethernet+Unix mail

Unfortunately, because I don't know UNIX/LINUX well, I really don't know 
any good office automation apps for the fourth option. If there were a 
shareware Linux clone of Word or WordPerfect, Excel or 1-2-3 and database 
that ran under a Linux GUI this would be a reasonable possibility.

If these applications existed, it would give MS a real run for their 
money, make linux/unix an attractive desktop possibility and make a HEAP 
of money for the legions of LINUX experts who have to do all the work.

I know of a couple of organisations, worth 100's of millions to billions 
of pounds who are starting to use LINUX (As a server OS...)

Just a thought....

Stephen Walters
odd...@CIX.compulink.co.uk
Tel 0956-544202.

From: b...@cc.gatech.edu (Byron A Jeff)
Subject: Re: Killer apps for Linux
Date: 1996/11/10
Message-ID: <5655iu$n65@solaria.cc.gatech.edu>#1/1
X-Deja-AN: 195660343
references: < E0Lo8F.6I0@cix.compulink.co.uk>
organization: Georgia Institute of Technology - College of Computing
nntp-posting-user: byron
newsgroups: comp.os.linux.advocacy


In article < E0Lo8F....@cix.compulink.co.uk>,
Stephen Walters < odd...@cix.compulink.co.uk> wrote:
>Here is an interesting dilemma. 
>
>I have a friend who has a small business, which he would like to network 
>and modernise. He has a handful of non-networked PC. His budget is 
>limited and he knows this. 

How limited. This is an intance where some effort can save a bunch of money.

>
>This is what I am currently considering:-
>
>1 NT Server + Win95 clients + ethernet + Ms exchange(Optional).

Bigf money

>
>2.Netware 4.1+ Win95 clients + ethernet +Novell MHS.

Still need big money.

>
>3.Linux server+ Win95 clients+ethernet+Unix send mail(Optional)

Cheaper (free server) But you still need applications.

>
>4.Linux server +Linux clients+ethernet+Unix mail

The ideal situation but of course I'm biased.... ;-)

>
>Unfortunately, because I don't know UNIX/LINUX well, I really don't know 
>any good office automation apps for the fourth option. If there were a 
>shareware Linux clone of Word or WordPerfect, Excel or 1-2-3 and database 
>that ran under a Linux GUI this would be a reasonable possibility.

Why bother with shareware. You can get WordPerfect for Linux (www.caldera.com
for the Linux version or get the SCO version and run it under ibcs2 emulation.)
As for excel type functionality check out XESS (www.xess.com) for a
very good spreadsheet, or Wingz (www.wingz.com). Linux has 3 or 4 rather
good database packages (Postgres95, msql, Flagship).

The best bets are three new office suites that are either released or in
beta testing for Linux.

1) Staroffice from Star Division in Germany. Freeware for Linux users. Can
read write both Word and Excel formats. Still in early beta and requires
Motif (Just saw a $42 run time package for Motif from Swim. Check out
comp.os.linux.announce for more info). The beta can be found at sunsite.unc.edu
(or mirrors like ftp.cc.gatech.edu) in /pub/Linux/apps/staroffice.

2) Applixware from Red Hat. A bit pricey ($495) but has everything.
(http://www.redhat.com/products/apx.html)

3) Corel is working on a Java based Office Suite that will run on any Java
enabled machine (including Linux). Problem is it's slower than molassas in
January right now. Looks promising though.

Of course Linux has dozens if not hundreds of applications that have simular
functionality. However folks seemed to be used to the integrated office
suite type application.

>
>If these applications existed, it would give MS a real run for their 
>money, make linux/unix an attractive desktop possibility and make a HEAP 
>of money for the legions of LINUX experts who have to do all the work.

Nope. Won't happen. It requires an intellegent, motivated user to switch. 
Most aren't and will use whatever comes on their machine.

>
>I know of a couple of organisations, worth 100's of millions to billions 
>of pounds who are starting to use LINUX (As a server OS...)

Yep. They're coming to the realization that the freely available OS can
do the job.

BAJ
-- 
Another random extraction from the mental bit stream of...
Byron A. Jeff - PhD student operating in parallel - And Using Linux!
Georgia Tech, Atlanta GA 30332   Internet: b...@cc.gatech.edu

			  SCO's Case Against IBM

November 12, 2003 - Jed Boal from Eyewitness News KSL 5 TV provides an
overview on SCO's case against IBM. Darl McBride, SCO's president and CEO,
talks about the lawsuit's impact and attacks. Jason Holt, student and 
Linux user, talks about the benefits of code availability and the merits 
of the SCO vs IBM lawsuit. See SCO vs IBM.

Note: The materials and information included in these Web pages are not to
be used for any other purpose other than private study, research, review
or criticism.